Cameos

This page shares stories that show how the National Disability Insurance Scheme will make a big difference to the lives of people with disability, and their families and carers.

Launch sites

Tiana is three years old and lives in South Australia

When Tiana is diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, her paediatrician refers her family to DisabilityCare Australia to access early intervention support. A planner from DisabilityCare Australia meets with Tiana and her parents at their home to talk about Tiana’s support needs and the family’s goals for her.

Tiana’s agreed plan includes therapies focused on motor skills, communication and social interaction to help Tiana to learn, play and express herself at the same level as other kids her age.  Tiana’s parents receive information and learn techniques to support Tiana’s development at home, and are connected to a local support group, which allows them to meet families in a similar situation. The plan includes a review date when Tiana enters preschool, to ensure her supports continue to match her needs.

Jo is 17 years old and lives in the Hunter region, NSW

Jo has Down syndrome and is approaching her final year at a local high school, which she attends with the help of an education aide. With the help of her Dad, Jo completes a short questionnaire about accessing the national disability insurance scheme and they meet with a planner from DisabilityCare Australia to talk about her goals and support needs.

Jo tells the planner about how she wants to learn to be more independent and her ideas for what she might like to do when she finishes school. Jo talks about how she likes to bake cakes with her schoolmates and how she is interested in working in the food industry.

Jo’s agreed plan includes access to supports to help her develop decision making and planning skills and learn to budget and navigate public transport. Jo’s mentor helps her find and attend a cooking class at a local community centre to develop her interest in food, and works with Jo and her school to explore future job and training options. Jo’s plan can be reviewed in the future, such as when she decides to start post-school training or work, to make sure it still reflects her goals and needs.

Jason is 38 years old and lives in the Barwon area, Victoria

Jason is 38 years old and has an acquired brain injury. Jason has always lived with his mother, Ruth, who provides all of his care and support. Jason and his mother visit a DisabilityCare Australia office about accessing the national disability insurance scheme and a planner from DisabilityCare Australia talks to them about Jason’s goals and support needs.

Jason tells the planner that he would like to be less dependent on his mother, particularly for his personal care needs, and is worried about the effect caring is having on her as she gets older. Jason’s agreed plan provides support to increase his independence over time. This includes therapies and training to develop his problem solving skills, memory and movement, and a support worker to assist with self-care and performing household tasks.

From Ruth’s point of view, Jason’s plan allows her to reduce the assistance she provides for him over time, with the knowledge that he will continue to receive the supports he needs.

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Eligibility

Jessica, spinal injury rehabilitation

Jessica is a 21 year old who acquires a spinal cord injury as a result of a sporting accident. Jessica is provided with acute care at a hospital where she receives support from spinal surgeons, rehabilitation physicians and other medical specialists.

After her surgery and acute care, she is able to walk with assistance but it is clear that she has sustained a permanent impairment in her legs and she moves into a hospital-based rehabilitation unit which aims to restore Jessica’s function as far as possible. The unit (funded by the health system) has a multidisciplinary team of spinal cord injury nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, social workers and clinical psychologists.

With Jessica’s agreement, the rehab unit contacts DisabilityCare Australia so that Jessica can work out a plan of future supports she will need to enable her to return home to her family. This identifies that she will need some equipment to assist her to walk and minor modifications to the bathroom and DisabilityCare Australia works with her family to get these in place before Jessica comes home. Her plan is also to return to uni but she now lacks the confidence she used to have. Her plan includes some short term coaching and the assistance of a Local Area Coordinator to talk to the uni about how they could change the layout of the classroom to enable easier access.

Aiden, early intervention for autism

Aiden is a two year old boy who attends a local early childcare centre. Aiden’s struggle to communicate often leads to vocal and physical outbursts which his parents and childcare centre staff find increasingly difficult to manage.

When Aiden is diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, his pediatrician refers him to DisabilityCare Australia for early intervention support. Aiden’s parents work with DisabilityCare Australia to develop a plan that includes therapies designed to improve his cognitive, behavioural and social development. Aiden’s family identify that it would be easier if he received his behavioural therapy during the times when he is at the childcare centre. A Local Area Coordinator works with Aiden and his family to negotiate these arrangements with the childcare centre and ensure that the centre staff are trained and confident in supporting the therapy goals.

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Reasonable and necessary

Nancy, ageing within scheme

Nancy is 57 years old and legally blind. She is a DisabilityCare Australia participant.

After knocking into a table at home, Nancy develops a bad gash on her leg, which is initially treated by her GP.  Following this, a nurse visits her for daily wound management. This is provided through the health system.

Nancy talks to a DisabilityCare Australia planner about reviewing her plan because she wants to make her house easier to manage and she is worried that as she becomes older her mobility is decreasing and she is losing contact with her community and family.  Nancy’s new plan includes several visits from an occupational therapist to design the best place to put guide rails, install a simple alert system to help Nancy move around her house safely and make her garden more accessible so that she can move outside with more confidence. Her plan also includes some additional transport costs so that she can gradually resume social activities at her own pace.

Caleb, psychosis

Caleb is 38 years old and experiences delusions and hallucinations due to psychosis. This has led to the breakdown of his marriage, loss of job and inability to work. Caleb requires intermittent access to acute clinical care, in addition to his ongoing treatment, and has been hospitalised many times for his condition. Caleb lives alone and has trouble caring for his own health.

Caleb’s goals are to care for his health, re-build his social connections, obtain employment and explore education opportunities. Caleb’s DisabilityCare Australia plan includes funding for psychosocial supports that build Caleb’s capacity to engage with the community, including training focused on his communication skills, and decision making. It also includes a simple electronic diary to help him plan his day. Caleb and DisabilityCare Australia talk to Caleb’s mental health services, to ensure that there are timely adjustments to his psychosocial supports during and after any acute episodes of care from the clinical sector.

A Local Area Coordinator assists Caleb to connect to local TAFE courses about parenting so that he feels is able to be a stronger dad.

Hussein, family coping with disability

Hussein is three years old and is receiving early intervention support from DisabilityCare Australia for his Autism Specrum Disorder.

While the social and communication skill development therapy that Hussein has been receiving through his plan have been going well, his mum is finding it increasingly difficult to cope with the assistance and attention Hussein needs on a daily basis. Hussein’s parents have also been struggling to cope with the reality of Hussein’s diagnosis and are uncertain and anxious about his future. This has put increased stress on their relationship.

The family talks to a DisabilityCare Australia planner about these concerns and as a result Hussein’s plan is reviewed to provide in-home training to build Hussein’s parents’ ability to maintain their caring role. A Local Area Coordinator also connects Hussein’s parents to a local support group and a Family Relationships Centre.

Hazel, complex support needs

Hazel is three years old and has a range of complex support needs, including from physical disability, which means she has difficulty moving around.

Hazel’s mum would like her to be able to start attending an early childhood centre two days a week, to allow Hazel to socialise with children her age. She talks to DisabilityCare Australia about helping Hazel achieve this. Hazel’s agreed plan includes a walking frame to help her move around more independently, including when she is at her childhood centre. The plan also provides physical and occupational therapies as early intervention to improve Hazel’s motor skills and help her learn to move around with and without her equipment.

A Local Area Coordinator (LAC) helps Hazel and her family to find an early childhood centre and works closely with them and DisabilityCare Australia to facilitate Hazel’s attendance, including helping Hazel’s mum negotiate for the early childhood centre to install some furniture that is easier for Hazel to use. The LAC also links the childhood centre to the Inclusion and Professional Support Program, which provides their staff with support and training on caring for children with high support needs.

Ciara, early intervention for Down syndrome

Ciara is a four year old girl with Down syndrome. Ciara attends an early childhood centre once a week and will soon be starting preschool. Ciara is already a participant of DisabilityCare Australia.

Ciara and her family work with a DisabilityCare Australia planner to review Ciara’s plan to make sure it is still meeting her needs and include assistance for this transition. Ciara’s updated plan continues to provide her with the supports she was already receiving, but changes the mix of therapies to focus more on her language and motor skills and less on personal care. The plan also focuses on skills that will help Ciara adjust to her new preschool, such as social and communication skill development.

Ciara’s plan also includes access to a Local Area Coordinator (LAC) to act as a facilitator for her transition to preschool. The LAC works with Ciara’s childcare provider to identify the supports Ciara currently needs to participate in the learning environment and uses this as a basis to coordinate with Ciara’s future preschool to ensure these same supports continue when she commences there.

Kofi, equipment and personal care

Kofi is 5 years old and is about to start school. He has a physical disability that affects his mobility.

Kofi and his family talk with a DisabilityCare Australia planner about how the scheme can support Kofi during this transition. As part of this conversation, Kofi’s family request that his plan include funding for his school uniforms, including specially made school shoes that he needs due to his disability.

Kofi’s agreed plan includes funding for his school shoes as these specifically relate to his functional needs. As Kofi does not require any other specific school clothing related to his disability, Kofi’s parents would be responsible for buying the remaining items of his school uniform.

Li, transport for university

Li is a 19 year old with spina-bifida who uses a wheelchair.

Li talks to a DisabilityCare Australia planner about how he needs support getting to places as he is unable to catch public transport because there are no accessible buses in his town. Li’s agreed plan includes funding for taxis so that he can travel between home and his university. Li would really like to learn to drive and to have a vehicle modified to meet his needs. His plan includes funds for the additional cost of driving lessons that are required to learn to use modified controls and a vehicle that allows Li to independently travel.

Li’s university continues to be responsible for providing the reasonable adjustments necessary for him to move around campus, such as wheelchair ramps, and the accessible transport that Li needs to participate in his studies when they go on excursions or have site visits.

Stephanie, return to work after long-term unemployment

Stephanie is 35 years old and aims to re-enter the workforce following 10 years of unemployment due to a psychosocial disability.

Stephanie meets with a DisabilityCare Australia planner to review her supports to help her achieve this new goal. This includes training to help build her capacity to manage effectively in a work environment, such as navigating workplace relationships, building her stamina and learning to respond to negative feedback, which will be provided by a Commonwealth funded Disability Employment Service. The support Stephanie is already receiving from DisabilityCare Australia will continue to be important as she searches for a job and when she starts working. This includes help with daily activities such as making sure she pays her bills and remembering to attend appointments, and involvement in a peer support group to build her social engagement skills.

Stephanie’s plan links her to a Local Area Coordinator (LAC), who puts her in contact with a nearby Disability Employment Services (DES), to help her prepare for, find and maintain a job. This includes assistance to help Stephanie work out her career goals and develop a resume. Once Stephanie finds a job, DES will also work with her employer to create an inclusive workplace environment.

Hitesh, moving out of home into private rental market

Hitesh is 26 years old and has an intellectual disability. He works part time at a local fresh food market. Hitesh currently lives with his parents but has been saving to move out with a friend. Hitesh and his parents talk to a DisabilityCare Australia planner about how moving out of home might work and what supports he might need.

Hitesh’s agreed plan provides support to help build his independence, including tenancy and financial literacy training through a local community service. The plan includes a review point for when Hitesh finds a place to live. Hitesh’s plan also links him to a Local Area Coordinator, who connects him to a number of government and non-government programs that help people find and apply for private rental properties.

Amelia, permanent home modifications

Amelia is a five year old girl with cerebral palsy who has severely limited mobility. She became a participant of DisabilityCare Australia following referral from the hospital when she was born. Amelia’s physiotherapist has recently recommended she start using a wheelchair, and her family work with a DisabilityCare Australia planner to review her plan so that it reflects her change in support needs.

The new agreed plan includes funding for Amelia’s wheelchair and modifications to the family home to make it wheelchair accessible, such as installing lever-type door handles and affixing ramps to the front and back of the house. The bathroom is also renovated to install an accessible shower and a lower sink.

Justin, temporary/minor modifications to rental property

Justin is 45 years old and uses a wheelchair to get around. Justin has recently been offered a promotion at work, which requires him and his family to move interstate for two years.

Due to this change in circumstances, Justin and a DisabilityCare Australia planner review his plan. Justin explains that because the move is not long term, he and his partner would prefer to rent rather than purchase a new property. Justin's agreed plan includes funding for home modifications if he is unable to find a rental property that is already accessible.

While house hunting, Justin and his partner come across a number of properties they would be happy renting if some minor modifications were made.
Justin and his partner find a landlord who is happy to make minor modifications. DisabilityCare Australia funds temporary ramps to the front and back of the house and grab rails to the bathroom walls.

DisabilityCare Australia works with the landlord to oversee their installation.

Cathy, car modifications

Cathy is 16 years old and uses a wheelchair to get around and relies on her family to help her to communicate. When Cathy becomes a DisabilityCare Australia participant, she and her parents meet with a planner to discuss her goals and support needs.

Cathy’s parents describe how they need to pull apart her wheelchair each time they use the car to fit it in and have to lift her into the car, which makes it difficult to frequently travel together as a family for short trips.

Cathy’s agreed package of support includes modifications to the family car and her wheelchair to make it easier for her to get in and out of the car.

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Interface with other systems

Ben, palliative care (health system)

Ben is 53 years old and has Down syndrome. He has been unable to secure a paid job. Ben has always lived with his mother, who is now 73 years old. Ben’s mother is happy to provide most of his care for now, such as helping him dress in the morning and preparing meals, but she is no longer confident in driving him to activities or appointments.

Ben works with DisabilityCare Australia to develop an individual plan including funding for weekly transport to his friends’ weekly card game and transport for when he has to attend appointments. When Ben is diagnosed with advanced stomach cancer, his GP refers Ben back to DisabilityCare Australia to have his plan reviewed to take account of the palliative care funded by the health system, which he will be receiving at home.

Ben will continue to be supported under DisabilityCare Australia to live at home with his mother. The symptoms of his cancer will be managed by the health system, through supports such as pain and nausea relief and emotional support to understand what his cancer diagnosis means.

Magda, parent with intellectual disability (family support system)

Magda is a single parent with an intellectual disability. She worries about her teenage daughter, Kelly, who does not have a disability, when Kelly is out of the house. Kelly has become increasingly anxious about her caring role and as a result combative and often challenging of her mother’s authority.

Magda’s plan includes referral to a relationship building course designed for people with disability and their families, which works with Magda to help her communicate with Kelly, and funding for Magda’s support worker to attend the course with her. The course also builds Magda’s confidence to participate in the community and identify some activities that she would like to do by herself and with Kelly outside of the house. Importantly, the course also recognizes Kelly’s caring role and builds strategies for communication with her mum.

Aisha, speech therapy (school system)

Aisha is a 10 year old with limited speech and communication skills resulting from autism spectrum disorder.

Aisha’s agreed DisabilityCare Australia plan includes support to improve her engagement and participation in school activities, including therapies focused on developing her speech and social skills. Aisha’s teacher has also identified a need to improve Aisha’s language skills and works with the school speech therapist to design a program that focuses on improving Aisha’s communication and learning through the literacy capabilities in the curriculum. This includes a teacher’s assistant, funded by the school, to enable Aisha to focus on achieving these goals in the classroom.

Sam, hydrotherapy (school system)

Sam is 14 years old with a severe physical and intellectual disability and attends a specialised high school. The high school has a hydrotherapy pool in the school grounds, which Sam uses regularly for additional hydrotherapy after school hours twice a week. Sam and her teachers feel that this additional hydrotherapy helps improve her muscle strength, as well as being fun. Sam’s parents pay a weekly fee for Sam and her physio to use the pool.

When Sam becomes a participant of DisabilityCare Australia, she and her parents talk with a planner about whether this support could be included in Sam’s funding. As the therapies largely help with Sam’s functioning, rather than a specific learning outcome, DisabilityCare Australia agrees to fund them as part of her plan.

A Local Area Coordinator works with the school to allow DisabilityCare Australia to fund a physio to use the school’s pool to work with Sam.

Mia, support to attend training (higher education and VET system)

Mia is 18 years old and has a profound hearing impairment. She has just completed high school and decided to seek an apprenticeship in plumbing. Mia and her family previously worked with DisabilityCare Australia to develop a plan for her support, which includes goals that she complete an apprenticeship and become more independent.

Mia secures an apprenticeship and spends four days a week in the workplace and one day per week in a registered training organisation. After an occupational assessment identifies that Mia is experiencing difficulties with her off-the-job training, a Local Area Coordinator works with the training provider so the provider can install a hearing loop to assist her learning and provides funding for the occupational therapist to provide advice about any other adjustments they can make to support Mia.

Mia also works with a DisabilityCare Australia planner to review her plan to include supports to improve her communication, which will help her participate more at training. This includes access to therapy one evening a week to improve her speech and develop her confidence talking in group environments.

Harry, return to work (employment system)

Harry is 46 years old and has multiple sclerosis (MS). Harry has been unemployed since his MS worsened from relapsing-remitting to secondary progressive two years ago but would like to start working again part-time.

Harry works with a DisabilityCare Australia planner to talk about what might assist him. Harry’s plan provides supports that will help him more effectively manage day-to-day activities, including his participation in the workplace. This includes therapies that help Harry recover from attacks, and a walking frame and exercise therapy to assist with his balance. The plan also includes referral to a Disability Employment Service (DES) for employment assistance, to help him meet his goal.

The DES provider works with Harry to find a part-time accounting job that matches his existing capabilities and knowledge. The DES Disability Management Service provides funding to Harry’s new employer through the Employment Assistance Fund to makes adjustments to the workplace. This includes workstation modifications and assistive technology, as well as arrangements for Harry to work from home if needed.

Although Harry does not require any personal care supports at work, DisabilityCare Australia will review his plan if his situation changes.

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Positive economic impacts

More work hours available to mum

Harry, 15, has a severe physical disability and complex health issues. He requires full assistance from 1-2 people to manage his everyday needs and is always in the care and supervision of an adult. Harry lives at home in Tasmania with his mum, dad and younger brother and attends his local high school. His father works full time and his mother works part time in two different jobs, structured around Harry’s needs. She has been unable to work during school holidays as support was not available for Harry.

Harry's goals are to have more independence from his family and to do more activities with his peers. The family's goals are for Harry to have his basic care needs met, and for the parents to be able to continue to work.

The plan includes one-to-one support and group support for after school and for some school holiday days to enable Harry’s mum to continue to work. The plan also addresses his therapy, equipment and basic care needs, including communication supports.

His parents have the benefit of knowing that support will be provided after school and during the school holidays, enabling them to continue with their employment with some certainty.

Brighter future for dad

For the first time, John feels like a client — not a charity case. Because now when the Tasmanian dad seeks services and supports for his teenagers, Bridget and Riley, John is backed by a personalised support plan and the money to fund that plan, under the NDIS. And to John that means a better, more secure future for his children.

“People are talking to me differently, and engaging in negotiation from another perspective," John said. He said he can now go to services armed with the plan and the funding, explain what his children need, and ask what they can provide.

“Suddenly, I’m a customer buying a product, not the recipient of charity,” John said.

Bridget, 19, who has developmental delays caused by a chromosomal deletion called Monosomy 1p36, and Riley, who has Autism Spectrum Disorder, both need support in most facets of their daily lives. As they grow older, their NDIS plans will be adapted to their changing needs, but for now, they focus on the skills and education Bridget and Riley need to become as independent as possible.

John said he can see the potential for his kids now and feels reassured and more confident about his children’s future.

Importantly, Bridget and Riley’s individual plans also increase John’s respite time, something he has had very little of since he gave up full-time work nine years ago to also care for his wife who eventually lost a long battle with breast cancer.

Better job prospects

Ian, 23, has autism and lives with his mother in Tasmania. Before meeting the NDIA, he was receiving one day a week support and was working with a mainstream employment service. His mother was concerned about his social isolation.

His main goal was to find work, preferably in hospitality, as he had worked in that industry and enjoyed it immensely. His other goals were to further his education in cooking, and to build his social skills.

Ian’s NDIS plan consisted of skill development in money management/decision-making, and a combination of individual and group social activities. He was referred to an NDIA Local Area Co-ordinator (LAC) to assist with implementing his plan.

Ian’s mother was overwhelmed with the support in his plan, and how much choice and control he had over who could provide the supports.
Three months later, Ian’s mum said that the money management support was working well, and that her son was becoming more independent in making decisions about purchases, and using an ATM.

Ian wants to take part in a certificate computing course, and a cooking course; both of which would develop his skill base, provide social opportunities with people of similar interests, and increase his job prospects.

Ian’s mum said she and her son were excited about his future, with the opportunities that have opened up for him in such a short space of time. She now believes that employment in the open market is a real possibility for her son, which was something she had been sceptical about.

Mum goes back to work

A South Australian mum has been out of the workforce so she can provide full-time care to one of her three children who has multiple disabilities and complex medical needs. The mum is self-managing NDIS funding to provide flexible in-home support to help her return to work part time initially. This mum is returning to work one day a week and hopes to build from there. Before the flexible NDIS-funded in-home support, she had not thought that a return to work was an option.

Freed up to continue working

Liam, 20, has Down syndrome and lives with his family in a rural community in Tasmania. An active person who enjoys keeping fit, Liam completed a TAFE course at the end of 2013. His mother was preparing to leave her job to care for him because she was unable to find any day activities for Liam for this year.

Through a friend she heard about the NDIA and, as a result, Liam now has a plan which includes day activities, twice a week. These activities not only provide Liam with an opportunity to socialise and learn skills, but also enable his mother to continue working in a job that she loves.

Liam’s speech is not always clear and this affects his ability to go out in the community independently. His plan includes an assessment for a device to enable him to communicate independently. It also includes speech therapy to help with his speech. His plan includes support to enable him to learn the new bus route from home to his day placement. This will enable Liam to continue to travel by public transport independently.

Liam’s family have organised volunteer work for him at the local specialist school, as well as some work experience in his community. These activities complement the funded supports and enable Liam to have a variety of social experiences and learning opportunities across the week.

Margaret targets a career

Margaret, of Newcastle, is in her 50s with long-standing spinal multiple sclerosis, and has been assessed as medically unfit for employment. She had to give up her business course because of an arm operation. And she felt that the repetitive nature of typing, in particular, would prevent her from obtaining even part-time work. She therefore, needed to reassess her career direction and employment opportunities.

In developing her NDIS plan, Margaret nominated the following goals:

  • gain part-time employment
  • increase social participation in a creative way
  • improve skills
  • maintain independent living.

The supports provided by the NDIS addressed independence and included one hour per week of domestic assistance. After initial discussion of Margaret’s interests, it was agreed to pursue her creative side. After several options were ruled out, she settled upon floristry. She used to enjoy hours in the garden which she is now unable to do. She is familiar with the botanical names of many plants and, most importantly, floristry dovetailed into her employment goals. An appropriate course was found which was held one day a week. Despite this being a long day (9am-5.30pm), she decided it was both reasonable and economical to study this way.

Extra supports available at the education institution were explained to her. These included tutorial support and exam modifications. These will assist her at times of absences, fatigue or lapses in concentration. She would like to set up her own part-time work or business, assisting floristry outlets at peak times of the year. Margaret may also qualify for the NEIS (New Enterprise Incentive Scheme) scheme, where she would have mentoring and financial support for the initial year of her business.

Studies, employment on the horizon

Shahni, a 31-year-old mum, is a TAFE student in business administration and legal studies. Despite a brain injury and physical disability caused by an accident when she was young, Shahni wants to either continue further study or gain paid employment.

Shahni is looking at social activities to help her make friends and for her 18-month-old daughter to connect with other children. Shahni found herself a playgroup at her local pre-school. Shahni was very keen to start some sort of education, but a little unsure of what she really wanted to do. The Local Area Co-ordinator (LAC) arranged a meeting with the local TAFE career counselling advisor after which a para legal business administrative course was agreed upon. The LAC connected Shahni to the disability unit at the TAFE to ensure all supports that Shahni needed were available for her.

Shahni is not only excelling at the course, but she has made many new friends and is thrilled to have someone to have lunch with at TAFE which she attends four days a week. She is already talking about her future studies and job opportunities that she will be able to connect to, as well as giving back in the volunteer sector from which she had previously herself sought help.

Kristy

Law graduate Kristy Trajcevski, from the Hunter region of NSW, has one aspiration many of us take for granted. She sees the individualised support of the NDIS as paving the way towards her goal of greater economic participation in the community.

“I'm probably the only person in Australia that actually looks forward to paying taxes because to me, paying taxes means that I am able to contribute to Australia.”

My story, my goals: Kristy Trajcevski Video captions

Mitchell

Mitchell Leedham, 20, from Ulverstone in Tasmania, is one of only three Australians with floating-harbour syndrome, and has autism, but is determined to achieve.

He wants a job which helps him save to travel abroad. He has set out a plan to put those goals and aspirations within reach.

“My first step in the next 12 months is to have a paid job, to build up to go overseas and have spending money.

“Asia, America, Britain and Europe – anywhere overseas.”

Stephanie eyes return to work

Stephanie is 35 years old and aims to re-enter the workforce after 10 years of unemployment due to a psychosocial disability.

Stephanie met with a NDIA planner to review her supports to help her achieve this new goal. This includes training to help build her capacity to manage effectively in a work environment, such as navigating workplace relationships, building her stamina and learning to respond to negative feedback, which will be provided by a Commonwealth funded Disability Employment Service.

Mia trains up

Mia is 18 years old and has a profound hearing impairment. She has just completed high school and decided to seek an apprenticeship in plumbing. Mia and her family had worked with the NDIA to develop a plan for her support, which includes goals that she complete an apprenticeship and become more independent.

Mia secured an apprenticeship and spends four days a week in the workplace and one day per week in a registered training organisation.

Harry hunts for a job

Harry is 46 years old and has multiple sclerosis (MS). Harry has been unemployed since his MS worsened two years ago but would like to start working again part-time.

Harry works with a NDIA planner to talk about what might assist him. Harry’s plan provides supports that will help him more effectively manage day-to-day activities, including his participation in the workplace. This includes therapies that help Harry recover from attacks, and a walking frame and exercise therapy to assist with his balance. The plan also includes referral to a Disability Employment Service (DES) for employment assistance, to help him meet his goal.

The DES provider works with Harry to find a part-time accounting job that matches his existing capabilities and knowledge.

Caleb shapes up for work

Caleb, 38, experiences delusions and hallucinations due to psychosis. This has led to the breakdown of his marriage, loss of job and inability to work. Caleb needs intermittent access to acute clinical care and ongoing treatment. Caleb lives alone and has trouble caring for his own health.

Caleb’s goals are to care for his health, re-build his social connections, obtain employment and explore education opportunities. Caleb’s NDIS plan includes funding for psychosocial supports that build Caleb’s capacity to engage with the community, including training focused on his communication skills, and decision making.

A Local Area Coordinator helps Caleb to connect to local TAFE courses about parenting so that he feels able to be a stronger dad.

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