FAQs - Organisations

What is ILC?

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) has two parts:

  • NDIS plans (sometimes known as individually funded packages) for eligible people with a disability, and
  • Information, linkages and capacity building or ILC.

Both parts contribute to the overall goal of the NDIS to enable people with disability to live an ordinary life.
The focus of ILC will be community inclusion - making sure people with disability are connected into their communities. ILC is all about making sure our community becomes more accessible and inclusive of people with disability.
We want to do this in two ways:

1. Personal capacity building - this is about making sure people with disability and their families have the skills, resources and confidence they need to participate in the community or access the same kind of opportunities or services as other people.

2. Community capacity building - that is about making sure mainstream services or community organisations become more inclusive of people with disability.

How is the NDIA rolling out ILC?

ILC was not part of the NDIS trial period. We are just starting to roll out ILC around the country.
In July last year, all governments in Australia agreed to the ILC Policy. The Policy describes the kinds of activities that will be funded in ILC in the future. They are grouped into five different areas:

  • Information, linkages and referrals
  • Capacity building of mainstream services
  • Community awareness and capacity building
  • Individual capacity building and
  • Local Area Coordination

The Policy has now been given to the NDIA to implement. We are doing that through the ILC Commissioning Framework . The Framework is our action plan for rolling out ILC around the country and explains how we will fund and manage activities in the first four areas described in the ILC Policy.
The fifth area, Local Area Coordination is being implemented separately by the NDIA. You can find out more about the role of LACs here.

We have just released the next version of the ILC Commissioning Framework. We will release the ILC Program Guidelines shortly.

Who is ILC for?

The focus of ILC will be community inclusion - making sure people with disability are connected into their communities. We want to do that in two ways - by increasing the capacity of people with disability as well as increasing the capacity of the community to be more accessible and inclusive. Increasing capability and promoting opportunities - that's what we want to see in ILC.

Unlike the rest of the NDIS, ILC won't provide funding to individuals. We will provide grants to organisations to carry out activities in the community. Nor will we set targets for particular groups of people or particular disabilities or disabilities. That means we expect the activities we fund in ILC to benefit a wide range of people. In fact many of the activities we will fund in ILC will benefit all people with disabilities - for example working to make community activities more accessible and inclusive will benefit all people with disability and their families and carers.

While many of the things we will fund in ILC will benefit all people with disability, we will have a particular focus in ILC in supporting those people with disability who do not have an individual NDIS plan to make sure they get the help they need.

What do we want ILC to achieve?

ILC represents a unique opportunity to change the conversation around inclusion. We don't just want people with disability to be present in the community - we want them to be active agents in it. That will only happen when genuine partnerships are forged between people with disability and the community. We want to use the ILC funding we have to help forge those partnerships.

What is different about ILC?

Up until now the Commonwealth, State and Territory governments have funded all kinds of different activities to support people with disability. The types of activities and how they were funded varied from state to state. It has therefore been difficult to get a consistent approach to improving outcomes for people with disability. We have a chance to change that through ILC.

ILC funding will be distributed through grants. The NDIA will provide grants to organisations to carry out activities. Organisations will have to show how those activities are making a difference to the lives of people with disability. The funding will be based on outcomes they achieve. This means organisations will need to develop skills and knowledge in understanding and measuring outcomes.

The NDIA will provde ILC grants funding through a range of selection processes. This will include open, competitive processes with a two stage application process in which: 

  • the first stage consists of an expression of interest. Applicants which are assessed as suitable will move to the next stage; and
  • the second stage consist of short-listed organisations submitting a more detailed application.

We know that moving to outcomes based funding and open grant rounds will represent a big change for many organisations. We are looking at ways we can help organisations get ready for the change.

How much funding is available in ILC?

The ILC budget will increase slowly over the next few years. In 2019/20, the total budget available will be $132 million. This money will be used to fund activities in the first four areas described in the ILC Policy. This amount does not include the budget for Local Area Coordination (LAC) - that is being implemented separately by the NDIA.

Is Local Area Coordination (LAC) part of ILC?

Just as ILC is essential to the overall success of the NDIS, Local Area Coordination (LAC) is central to the success of ILC. LACs will be the single largest investment by the NDIA in delivering outcomes for ILC.
LACs will have three important jobs:

  1. Work directly with people with disability over the age of 7 years old who have an NDIS plan to connect into mainstream services and community activities and get their plan into action
  2. Provide short term assistance to people who do not have an NDIS plan to connect into mainstream services and community activities
  3. Work with their local community to make it more accessible and inclusive.

LACs will be skilled at helping people with disability who come from all walks of life. But it is unreasonable to expect they will be able to help everyone with everything all of the time. So we will fund activities in ILC that will complement and strengthen their role. We will for example fund peer support groups that

LACs will be able to refer people to. Or they might refer people to a website that has information about particular disabilities or conditions. Or they help people find resources or training that we have funded through ILC.

At the moment, how LAC services are being delivered and who they support varies across the country. For example there are some different arrangements in place to support the large number of people with disability who are moving into the NDIS over the next couple of years. For more detailed information about the LAC arrangements for each State and Territory please visit our LAC webpage.

How will ILC, LAC and ECEI work together?

The work of ILC, LAC and Early Childhood Early Intervention (ECEI) are all linked. All make an important contribution to the overall goal of the NDIS to help people with disability to achieve their goals and live an ordinary life. The focus of all three is to look at ways to improve community inclusion for people with disability.

The NDIA's approach to ECEI is focused on children with disability or developmental delay aged 0 to 6 years and their families. The family-centred approach is about focusing on the individual needs of each child and working with families to identify appropriate supports and to link them with mainstream services. The ECEI approach will lead to greater inclusion for children with disability by building on family strengths and growing the capacity of mainstream and community services to support children with developmental delay or disability.

In a similar way, the role of the LAC is to link people with disability into mainstream services and activities in their community. They will also work within their local communities to make sure they become more accessible and inclusive. LACs also have a particular role in helping people with disability who do not have an NDIS plan.

We will use the funding we have in ILC to make sure there is information and support available to people with disability and their families that our LAC and ECEI partners can refer people and families to so they can get the help they need. For example we will fund information about particular kinds of disabilities or conditions that our ECEI and LAC partners can use and refer people with disabilities and their families to. They can then use that information to help them make decisions.

More information about Local Area Coordination and Early Childhood Early Intervention including where they are located and what they do - is on the NDIS website.

When will ILC start in my area?

ILC will start at different times across Australia. ILC is expected to start in each State and Territory on the following dates:

1 July 2017

Australian Capital Territory

1 July 2018

South Australia
New South Wales

1 July 2019

Tasmania
Victoria
Queensland
The start date for ILC in Western Australia and Northern Territory is still to be decided.

What will happen before ILC starts?

State and Territory governments will work with organisations that currently deliver ILC-type activities that may fit into ILC in the future to let them know what the funding arrangements will be leading up to the start of ILC in each state.

When will ILC start in the ACT?

The first State or Territory to participate in the ILC process will be the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). We will call for applications at the end of January 2017. Funding will commence from 1 July 2017.

The experiences in the ACT will be used to inform the process used in other States and Territories.

What will be the grants process in the ACT?

Before ILC commences in the ACT the NDIA will hold information sessions in mid-November 2016. Information sessions will provide the opportunity for organisations to learn more about the process of applying for ILC funding.

We will then call for applications in late January. Organisations will have six weeks to complete their application.

Funding will be provided to successful organisations from 1 July 2017.

What will be the grants process in my area?

ILC will start at different times across Australia.

Before ILC begins in each state and territory the NDIA will hold information sessions to explain the process of applying for funding.

For more information on the grants process please read the ILC Commissioning Framework and the Program Guidelines for ILC.

How much funding will be allocated to the ACT when ILC gets underway?

More information about the amount of money for the ACT will be available when the applications open next year.

What will happen to national projects?

The different times at which each State and Territory moves to ILC will have an impact on the NDIA's ability to fund national projects through the annual open grant round. We will therefore not start the national annual round for national projects until all the states and territories have moved in and we have the full ILC budget.

In the meantime, the NDIA may fund nationally consistent projects that have State-based delivery, or trial a project that may be suitable for national funding in the future. These projects will build the readiness of the sector and the community to operate within a nationally consistent approach to ILC.

Where can I find information about who may apply, the application process and the assessment process?

Further detail about the application process including the selection criteria and eligibility requirements will be provided in the Program Guidelines for ILC.

Where can I find information about what activities will and won't be funded?

Information on eligible and ineligible activities will be provided in the Program Guidelines for ILC.

Where can I find more information to help me get ready?

The NDIA has funded the development of an ILC Toolkit to help organisations to prepare for the ILC grants process. This Toolkit will be trialled in the ACT later this year and will be available nationally in January 2017.

Where can I find more information on ILC?

Please visit the ILC page for other relevant documents including the ILC Policy and the ILC Commissioning Framework .
The ILC Commissioning Framework is also available in Easy English (PDF 3.5MB).

How can my organisation get updates about ILC?

Organisations and individuals can register to receive updates on ILC by signing up to the ILC mailing list.