State and Territory Government SDF activities

This section describes the SDF funded activities undertaken by each state and territory government. Some of these projects have produced information and resources that can be used across Australia.

State and territory governments combined their own funding with SDF funding to expand certain projects.

Australian Capital Territory

Contact: ndis@act.gov.au

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Market development

Marketing – attracting and retaining staff

This project aims to expand the disability sector workforce to meet demand in the NDIS.

Timeframe: 2016 –17 (current)

Overview: This project recognises the need to attract new staff to the disability sector and retain existing staff to meet the needs of the growing NDIS market.

It is designed to integrate disability sector workforce attraction strategies with existing government programs that provide support and work-related training for job seekers in Canberra and the surrounding regions. It is developing marketing resources and conducting:

  • internal marketing, especially materials for providers’ existing staff about their roles and career pathways
  • external marketing, especially shaping the community’s perceptions of what it means to work in the sector.

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 4—assist with the expansion and diversification of the workforce required to meet increased demand.

It will attract new workers to the sector and contribute to the retention of valuable workers who are difficult to retain over the long-term.

Resources: Links to the sustainable promotional resources produced will be provided once these are available.

You may also be interested in:

  • Providers looking to recruit more workers: accessing the information and resources on the Carecareers website, including the disability-specific job board.
  • Providers with new staff: accessing the orientation training for new workers.

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A healthy community of providers—innovative and sustainable models and sector collaboration

This project aims to build innovative and sustainable support models for the NDIS context.

Timeframe: 2016–17 (current)

Overview: This project recognises the need to facilitate access to expertise and assistance for providers to develop innovative and sustainable service delivery models.

It involves:

  • supporting providers to explore the potential for transforming their service delivery models
  • providing actionable, expert advice on building effective teams and high performing work practices
  • supporting organisations to accelerate their progress
  • fostering collaboration between organisations.

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 2—increase capacity of people with disability and their families to exercise choice and control and develop new forms of support to meet the needs of people with disability.

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Initial capacity building activities

Building the capacity of people with disability, their families and carers

These initiatives aimed to build the capacity of people with disability, their families and carers to engage with the NDIS.

Timeframe: 2013­–16 (complete)

Overview: These initiatives recognised the need to build awareness and understanding of the NDIS, and support people with disability to exercise choice and control in the NDIS.

  • A range of community awareness and capacity building activities were delivered.
    • Community Conversations (small gatherings in a range of venues) targeted communities and local networks to raise awareness of the NDIS.
    • Capacity building workshops for people with disability and their families were delivered in partnership by local and interstate providers.
    • An Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ outreach worker worked across all Indigenous communities in the ACT to build people’s understanding of the NDIS and what it may mean for them and their families and to connect people to the NDIA.
  • The My Choice Self-Directed Funding Pilot was expanded to support increased choice and control.
  • The Your Voice Your Choice, Good Life Planning Program used a range of strategies to reach and connect with people outside the formal service system who might have found it hard to engage with the NDIS. Initiatives included:
    • a peer support network for people with psychosocial disability
    • one-to-one support to help people plan what a good life can look like for them or their family member
    • targeted approaches to engage people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, people with disability who may be socially-isolated, and people living in supported accommodation settings.
  • Digital story telling videos captured the changes people experienced through the Enhanced Service Offer grant process and as they made choices about their supports and services.
  • Participant Preparedness 2015 and 2016 Community Participation Grants helped to raise awareness of the NDIS.
    • A total of 316 people with disability and families received up to $1,000 to assist them to take part in training and information events, prepare for the NDIS, and develop and implement life plans and informal supports.
    • Eleven community providers received up to $10,000 to host NDIS awareness raising activities.

A Peer Led Co-ordination Group—supported by the ACT NDIS Taskforce—was formed to oversee these community capacity building activities.

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Building the capacity of providers

These initiatives aimed to build the capacity of providers to transition to the NDIS.

Timeframe: 2013–16 (complete)

Overview: These initiatives recognised the need to support providers transform their operating models to successfully transition to the NDIS:

  • NDIS Workforce Awareness Package: Resources for educators and trainers targeted to disability sector workers were developed through consultation with people with disability, providers and government stakeholders.
  • NDIS Governance and Financial Management Reform Package for ACT providers: $20,000 grants to 25 service providers for governance and financial management services provided by a select panel of consultants.
  • Business Investment Package for ACT providers: Assistance in the form of professional consultancy input, equipment (including ICT) and non-recurrent staffing to implement organisational change, to a maximum value of $50,000, was provided to 52 service providers.
  • Analysis of financial contribution of philanthropy and volunteerism, and the impact of the NDIS on providers: An external consultant explored the level of philanthropic funding that organisations receive and how this might change in the NDIS and identified strategies to mitigate the risk of losing philanthropic and volunteer resources after the NDIS launch.
  • Better Practice Guide for Emerging Leaders in the ACT Disability Sector: Guidance on building an organisational culture that supports the growth of staff who demonstrate strong leadership skills, including practical ideas for better business practice. The guide was informed by consultations with emerging leaders in the sector and providers of leadership and development training. 
  • Maturing the Market: Ready4 (a partnership of National Disability Services, ACTCOSS and RSM Bird Cameron) was funded to support ACT disability service providers to operate successfully in the NDIS. Ready4 included an information portal; a range of NDIS preparation tools and resources; one-on-one and small group support; and business, system and governance model development to help providers to implement their NDIS development strategies.
  • Building Culturally Sensitive Disability Services: Opening Doors (delivered by Nous Group, Lifestyle Solutions and First Peoples Disability Network) was designed to build the availability of culturally sensitive disability services in the ACT. It offered an intensive targeted response to three local Aboriginal organisations to build their capacity to provide disability services in the ACT. It also worked with thirteen mainstream disability providers to deliver culturally sensitive services and identify Aboriginal people to work in the disability sector.
  • Person-centred Workforce Development: This program supported organisations to develop their workforces to operate in the NDIS. JFA Purple Orange provided intensive assistance to five ACT disability providers committed to developing a sustainable, high-performing person-centred workforce. A network of leaders from each participating organisation was established for joint training and peer support. An online platform of values-based leadership resources was developed for this group. 

Resources: Access more information about ACT sector development activities.

Background research: Paper on philanthropy and volunteering in the ACT disability sector (external).

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New South Wales

Contact: Sector.Readiness@facs.nsw.gov.au

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The enablement support model project

This project aimed to increase the independence of people with disability who are ineligible for the NDIS.

Timeframe: 2015–16 (complete)

Overview: This project recognised the need to connect people with disability who were found ineligible for the NDIS with supports in the mainstream system.

It offered support to people in Trial site locations who were Community Care Supports Program clients, but had not completed an access request for the NDIS or had been found ineligible. It offered four different support options:

  • a six-week intensive enablement focused intervention
  • assistance with reapplication to the NDIS
  • referrals to other agencies
  • a twelve-week enabling support program for people with chronic conditions.

These options were modified from the approach initially planned to meet needs as they emerged.

Outcomes: This project contributed to SDF Outcome 2—increase capacity of people with disability and their families to exercise choice and control and develop new forms of support to meet the needs of people with disability.

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Initial capacity building projects

NGO Loan financing project

This project aimed to build NGO provider sustainability.

Timeframe: 2013–14 (complete)

Overview: This project recognised that some NGOs would require access to loan financing to successfully manage their transition to the NDIS.

This project delivered a key report, The potential role of loans in the ADHC funded NGO sector, which addressed:

  • the potential role of loans in supporting the ADHC funded NGO sector, including as a response to cash flow issues of NGOs moving from block funding to individual funding
  • the type of debt financing institutions and products available
  • barriers for NGOs to access debt finance and how these may be addressed
  • the potential for innovative approaches to provide debt financing and access debt finance
  • recommendations for reducing barriers to better enable NGOs to access loan finance and support the transition to new funding arrangements.

The project also developed two key resources to help NGOs understand the loan financing options available and promote discussion within NGOs about the potential for loans to meet their financing needs. They were:

  • a short whiteboard animation video about loan financing options for disability service providers
  • a Loan Financing for Service Providers Toolkit, which provides more information about loan options, case studies, a self-assessment check list, and links to further resources and financial service providers.

The use of a simple and engaging scribed video format was found to be a highly effective way to introduce the idea of loan financing. The Toolkit, which built on the video content, was found to be an effective next step for considering loan finance.

The project was informed by the project Steering Committee consisting of NGO representatives, NDS, the Council of Social Services of NSW and ADHC.

Outcomes: This project contributed to SDF Outcome 3—build disability sector capacity and service provider readiness to manage the transition.

The project activities were designed to meet the needs identified through a literature scan and stakeholder consultation.

Project resources:

Watch the short video (external) about loan financing options for disability service providers.

Read the Loan Financing for Service Provider Toolkit (external), including the checklist to gauge your organisation’s readiness for loan financing.

Background research:

The potential role of loans in the ADHC funded NGO sector: Summary report (external).

NGO Loan Financing Project Evaluation Report (external).

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Unit Costing Tool Project

This project aimed to build NGO capacity to calculate the cost of their services to assist them to remain viable in the NDIS.  

Timeframe: 2013–14 (complete)

Overview: This project recognised that providers accustomed to block funding would need tools to undertake unit costing for their services.

The project developed a resource toolkit to support providers with unit costing. This included:

  • a video resource to help NGOs understand what unit costing is and why it is important
  • fact sheets to explain the theory and methodology of unit costing
  • an excel-based unit costing worked example to provide a practical example of how to develop a basic unit costing model for a small organisation 
  • summaries of suitable commercial software solutions to assist NGOs to select the most suitable option
  • case studies of NGOs’ experiences piloting the software.

By undertaking a collaborative and flexible approach, the project was able to develop a suite of resources, rather than one tool or report, to respond to the needs of disability service providers which vary in size and financial management capability.

The project activities were informed and guided by a project Steering Committee.

Outcomes: This project contributed to SDF Outcome 3—build disability sector capacity and service provider readiness to manage the transition.

The project filled the gap identified by providers for user-friendly resources that would support them to collect and prepare the financial and operational data required for unit costing.

Feedback indicated that the resources were relevant and useful for some, if not all organisations, depending on their stage of preparedness for the transition to the NDIS. The project Steering Committee was satisfied that the resources reflected industry standards for unit costing.

The project also made an important innovation by linking the disability sector with commercial financial management software providers who could provide unit costing as an in-built function or an add-on to standard software systems. Feedback from organisations that piloted the unit costing software was positive. They reported that vendors were very helpful with installing the software, training finance staff and answering questions.

Project resources: Access the Unit Costing Toolkit (external), including an introductory guide and video, information factsheets, the excel-based unit costing worked example and unit costing software case studies.

You may also be interested in:

  • Learning about the benchmarking function that will enable providers to compare cost and operational metrics to their peers.
  • Accessing the NDS Costing and Pricing Learning Program guide, webinars and workshops. 

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Cash Flow Analysis

This project aimed to build not-for-profit disability service provider capacity to manage cash flow and remain viable in the NDIS.

Timeframe: 2013–14 (complete)

Overview: This project recognised that not-for-profit disability service providers may face cash flow challenges during the transition from block funding paid in advance, to individualised funding paid after services.

It developed a set of resources to support not-for-profit disability service providers to overcome key cash flow challenges.

  • The Cash Management Maturity Assessment: A comprehensive self-assessment questionnaire to help providers determine their ability to manage current and future cash flow, and identify and prioritise areas that require improvement.
  • A library of cash flow resources:
    • three video resources to explain the basics of cash flow management in a clear and engaging way
    • solution-focused factsheets to help providers identify practical ways to manage their cash flow in priority areas, including: cost containment, cash flow levers, robust cash flow and capital expenditure, and working capital management.

A collaborative and flexible approach was taken to develop resources to meet the diverse needs of the sector. Care was taken to ensure that the resources were easy to locate and navigate, used simple language, were practical and actionable, were tailored to the needs of not-for-profit disability service providers and were based on leading best practice. After piloting, further refinements were made based on provider feedback.

The project activities were informed and guided by a project Steering Committee.

Outcomes: This project contributed to SDF Outcome 3—build disability sector capacity and service provider readiness to manage the transition.

The resources developed through this project were designed to meet the needs of not-for-profit disability service providers identified through consultation. They assist providers to anticipate future cash flow issues, plan strategically and make more feasible operational decisions under the new NDIS fee-for-service funding arrangements.

All of the providers that piloted the resources reported that they were both relevant and useful. The project Steering Committee was satisfied that they reflected industry standards for cash flow analysis.

Project resources: Access the Cash Management Maturity Assessment, video resources and fact sheets (external) to support you to establish and maintain a healthy cashflow.

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Northern Territory

Contact: rex.o’rourke@nt.gov.au

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Capacity building with individuals and families to promote readiness and planning for person-centred supports

This project aims to build the capacity of people with disability, their families and carers to effectively engage with the NDIS.

Timeframe: 2016–18 (current)

Overview: This project recognises that people with disability, their families and carers in the Northern Territory face barriers accessing disability supports due to information flow and service coordination issues, and that Indigenous people with disability face additional barriers.

This project is helping to address these issues by supporting service providers to achieve high cultural competence and understanding of the types of supports that are available to people with disability through the NDIS, and how to access them. This is occurring in four phases:

  • establishing baseline readiness and engaging with key stakeholders to determine appropriate ways to build the capacity of people with disability, their families and carers
  • designing and distributing resources through appropriate processes, channels and formats
  • delivering capacity building activities
  • project review and reporting.
  • Project activities will invest in building capacity of individuals with disability, their families, carers and communities, making use of existing knowledge and positive relationships in the government and disability sectors, and seeking continuous feedback to ensure capacity building resources and activities meet the needs of Indigenous and non-Indigenous people with disability, their families and carers.

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 1—build community capacity and engagement—and SDF Outcome 2—increase the capacity of people with disability and their families to exercise choice and control and develop new forms of support to meet the needs of people with disability.

It will identify the best-fit support mechanisms to maximise individuals’ engagement and interaction with the NDIS—raising awareness and equipping people with disability, their families and carers with the information they need to effectively engage with the planning process.

Resources: This project will produce a series of culturally appropriate resources for people with disability, their families and carers to understand and engage with the NDIS. Links to these will be provided when available.

You may also be interested in:

  • People with disability, their families and carers: accessing information and resources through the Disability Loop website and Youtube Channel, including the ‘Let’s Yarn’ page for Indigenous people with disability.
  • People with disability: joining a Peer Support Network, including Networks for Indigenous people with disability, their families and carers.

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Community Plans and local decision-making in remote communities

This project aims to support remote communities to successfully engage with the NDIS.

Timeframe: 2016–18 (current)

Overview: This project recognises that for people with disability in remote and very remote areas to be the drivers behind disability services, providers need information about their unique needs and priorities, and encouragement to provide services in these markets.

The project is co-designing Community Plans for remote areas in the Northern Territory—Darwin Remote, Katherine, Central Australia, Barkly and the East Arnhem region—to inform service provision and direct necessary services to these areas. This involves:

  • reviewing existing data sources from the Northern Territory Government, Commonwealth and the NDIA to develop the method and approach for community analysis
  • developing community consultation and engagement materials through reviewing relevant documentation and working with local communities
  • analysing the current disability service system in each region to better understand the support experiences of people with disability
  • understanding current and future needs in each region by consulting with people with disability, their families and carers, community leaders, and providers
  • assessing market interest in expanding to these regions among broader Northern Territory providers and interstate providers with the potential to expand
  • assessing market interest in expanding to disability services from related sectors such as allied health, aged care and education
  • identifying opportunities for market development and strategies to implement these in the short and long term
  • presenting formal Community Plans as living documents that evolve overtime with the NDIS rollout.

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 3—build disability sector capacity and service provider readiness to manage the transition—and SDF Outcome 5—build the evidence base about what works.

It will increase access to quality disability supports that enable Indigenous communities to live in their community and stay connected to their family and culture.

Resources: Links to resources will be provided once these are available.

You might also be interested in:

  • Finding out about the current Queensland project supporting provider readiness in hard-to-reach and diverse markets
  • Accessing the Queensland-developed toolkit community capacity building toolkit, designed to support rural, remote and discrete Indigenous community providers. 

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Innovative service models to increase access to supports

This project aims to develop new and more tailored supports to increase choice and control for people with disability.

Timeframe: 2016–18 (current)

Overview: This project recognises a current gap in the supply of community access supports and short-term supported living options for people with disability in the Northern Territory, and that people in remote communities experience additional barriers accessing these services.

This project is identifying ideas for service innovation and enhancements, drawing on Community Plans and consultation with people with disability and community leaders to understand current needs and opportunities. Providers may be directly engaged for work on a particular project, or may submit proposals through a public submissions process.

 The project is funding ideas that:

  • respond to a critical community issue that would enable new supports to be provided to people with disability
  • do things differently or in a new way that has not been tried before
  • demonstrate a high level of collaboration and connection with other stakeholders working towards the same area of interest
  • have the support of the local community, including people with disability, other service providers and community leadership
  • clearly articulate what outcomes and impact the proposal will have on the lives of people with disability in remote communities.

Outcome: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 2—increase capacity of people with disability and their families to exercise choice and control and develop new forms of support to meet the needs of people with disability.

It will support innovation in remote communities to address the challenges associated with disability service delivery in the Northern Territory. By increasing available supports, including meaningful day options, ‘on-community’ supports, and short-term supported living in remote areas, the project will increase the capacity of people with disability to exercise choice and control.

Resources: This project will produce a range of resources linking people with disability to enhanced and innovative services. Links will be provided once these are available.

You may also be interested in:

  • Finding out about the current Queensland project supporting provider readiness in hard-to-reach and diverse markets.
  • Finding out about the remote and rural Indigenous allied health workforce development project.

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Development of Northern Territory Quality and Safeguards

This project aims to increase provider capacity to meet quality assurance standards in time for the NDIS rollout.

Timeframe: 2016–18 (current)

Overview: This project recognises that providers need support to develop their quality and safeguarding practices to meet the requirements set for the NDIS.

It is assessing provider quality assurance by examining their policies, practices and corporate governance; supporting providers to develop a quality improvement plan to address any identified issues; and providing a range of sector development activities to address practice gaps. These include:

  • Governance and Financial Management Reform packages: engaging expert consultants to provide disability service providers with tailored assessment and advice on their financial management, governance arrangements and business planning in the NDIS context.
  • Targeted industry information sessions and workshops: engaging expert consultants to address known development needs among service providers, including service delivery and reform, service marketing, workforce capacity and development, business and financial management reform, organisational change management, and restrictive practices and abuse.
  • Promoting culturally safe and secure services: increasing the number and range of culturally sensitive and sustainable disability services by encouraging and assisting Indigenous providers to move into the delivery of the NDIS, and assisting mainstream providers to provide culturally safe and competent services.
  • Reducing restrictive practices and abuse: providing Promoting Dignity Grants as an additional incentive and opportunity for disability service providers and workers to implement creative, practical and alternative solutions for people with disability who are subject to restrictive practices, and tailoring the existing Zero Tolerance program to train providers to reduce the risk of and improve responses to, abuse and neglect.
  • Developing the capacity of people with disability to self-advocate: engaging expert consultants to facilitate workshops, training and skills development products for people with disability and their families to exercise their rights under the NDIS, build their own vision and goals for the future, and negotiate with providers and the NDIS.

Providers are also being encouraged to use a self-assessment tool to build their own quality assurance capacity.

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 3—build disability sector capacity and service provider readiness to manage the transition.

It will promote quality, safe and person-centred practices; increase provider capacity to meet quality assurance requirements in the NDIS; and support people with disability to exercise choice and control.

Resources: This project will produce a range of workshop materials, a toolkit of resources and other supports. Links will be provided once these are available.

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Growing remote workforce capacity

This project aims to develop and increase the Indigenous disability services workforce, particularly in remote areas.

Timeframe: 2016–18 (current)

Overview: This project recognises the need to attract local Indigenous people into the disability services workforce to provide positive and culturally safe outcomes for Indigenous people with disability, and that a key barrier to increasing the number of Indigenous support workers is a lack of suitable training programs and resources in remote communities.

It is developing training packages tailored to the language, literacy, numeracy and cultural requirements of training participants, based on the existing Vocational Education Training Certificate III and Certificate IV in Disability, and including coverage of specialist areas, such as person-centred planning.

It is also establishing Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) to deliver face-to-face training and supports in remote communities for Indigenous people that express an interest in, and have the potential to become, support workers. RTOs will recruit participants from selected remote communities, deliver the developed training and supports, and gather consistent feedback to improve the training and better develop the capacity of the existing and new workforce.

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 4—assist with the expansion and diversification of the workforce required to meet increased demand.

It will attract new entrants to the disability services industry by improving access to Certificate III or IV in Disability and related training programs in selected remote communities.

Resources: This project will produce culturally appropriate training and promotional resources for Indigenous people interested in becoming support workers in the remote Northern Territory. Links will be provided once these are available.

You may also be interested in:

  • Finding out about the Remote Accredited Training to support remote service provision.
  • Finding out about the remote and rural Indigenous allied health workforce development project.

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Initial capacity building projects

Timeframe: 2013–16 (complete)

Overview: Initial projects in the Northern Territory included:

  • a needs analysis of existing providers to target training in contemporary disability service provision, practice issues arising out of NDIS legislation and quality improvement projects
  • assisting NGOs in business planning, process and procedures to support the NDIS transition, especially around the financial implications of moving from block funding to individualised funding
  • mapping the Northern Territory mainstream organisations to identify providers that could deliver Information, Linkages and Capacity Building supports, and innovative supports to address service gaps.

Queensland

Contact: ndis@communities.qld.gov.au

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Raising awareness and building the skills of people with disability to engage with the NDIS and planning process

This project aims to reduce the time taken for participants to enter the NDIS by ensuring they are aware of the NDIS and prepared for the planning process.

Timeframe: 2016–18 (current)

Overview: This project recognises the need to build awareness of the NDIS in Queensland, where there has not been an NDIS Trial site, and to help people with disability prepare for the new planning process to support timely access to the NDIS.

The project supports the continuation of the Queensland Department of Communities Participant Readiness Initiative, which involves eleven non-government organisations delivering a range of activities and resources to support people with disability, their families and carers, to prepare for the NDIS.

Activities include workshops, meetings, forums, home visits, coaching and mentoring, online and other resources to build the capacity of participants to engage successfully with the NDIS.

Targeted engagement strategies are being designed to reach specific population groups that have had limited opportunities to engage in previous NDIS readiness activities, including people from Indigenous and culturally and linguistically diverse communities, and people who are socially isolated or homeless.

As the NDIS is rolled out across Queensland, providers will hand over information on learnings, emerging issues, identified gaps and recommendations to inform NDIA readiness activities.  

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 1—build community capacity and engagement—and SDF Outcome 2—increase capacity of people with disability and their families to exercise choice and control and develop new forms of support to meet the needs of people with disability.

The project’s capacity building activities will increase participants’ understanding of the NDIS and preparedness to engage in the NDIS planning process.

Project resources: Links will be provided as they become available.

You may also be interested in:

  • People with disability, their families and carers: accessing information and resources through the Disability Loop website and Youtube Channel.
  • People with disability: joining a Peer Support Network.

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Provider readiness in hard-to-reach and diverse markets

This project aims to support the development and sustainability of an NDIS support market for hard-to-reach and diverse segments.

Timeframe: 2016–18 (current)

Overview: This project recognises the need to increase service delivery to hard-to-reach and diverse market segments.

This project is targeting:

  • providers delivering services in rural and remote communities and those with disability services as a small portion of their business
  • Indigenous providers in both urban settings and discrete communities
  • providers delivering supports to people with complex needs or from culturally and linguistically diverse communities.

The project is using a strengths-based approach to develop and rollout intersecting initiatives that build the capacity of service providers in these hard-to-reach market segments. It involves workshops, forums and other activities in community locations. Activities focus on:

  • identifying where place- or niche-based opportunities exist for a broader range of organisations to take up NDIS service provider roles
  • identifying the level of provider engagement with NDIS and local market opportunities, and assisting in designing tailored strategies to empower service providers to engage strategically with the NDIS
  • enabling service providers to identify, make use of and extend latent organisational resources, innovations and capacities into the NDIS environment
  • empowering service providers to lead and engage strategically with communities to support development of business insights and market capacities that meet the community’s disability support needs
  • supporting service providers to use and tailor existing tools and resources to support ongoing transition and growth, particularly skills to respond to consumer needs.

The project draws on resources developed in Queensland through past SDF funding, including the toolkit for building providers to respond to consumer demand (external), and the community capacity building toolkit (external), designed to support rural, remote and discrete Indigenous community providers. 

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 3—build disability sector capacity and service provider readiness to manage the transition.

The project will harness business and sector expertise to develop initiatives that respond to the unique challenges and opportunities of hard-to-reach and diverse market segments, and will increase targeted providers’ readiness for the NDIS.  

You might also be interested in:

  • Accessing the Queensland-developed toolkit for building provider capability to respond to consumer demand
  • Accessing the Queensland-developed toolkit community capacity building toolkit, designed to support rural, remote and discrete Indigenous community providers. 

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Workforce expansion and diversification

This project aims to support workforce expansion by engaging, attracting and connecting people to jobs in the sector.

Timeframe: 2016–18 (current)

Overview: This project recognises that the challenges around workforce expansion and the opportunities for diversification will differ across Queensland.

The WorkAbility project is continuing the Queensland NDIS NGO Workforce Strategy, which began in 2015 in the North Queensland early launch site. It is enabling local workforce solutions to meet local needs through partnership and collaboration with people with disability, key stakeholders, targeted engagement of people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, and Indigenous people. It includes the following activities.

  • The development and implementation of state-wide workforce supply and capability initiatives to support workforce engagement and attraction, including:
    • industry employment and training forums
    • information and workshops targeting schools career advisors, TAFE Job Placement Officers, university lecturers and placement officers
    • information and workshops targeting labour sources, including disability employment service providers, recruitment agencies, schools and universities.
  • The development and promotion of an NDIS workforce-specific communication package for potential workers and employers, including:
    • information supporting targeted engagement and attraction of new cohorts of workers for the market
    • a workforce video
    • the WorkAbility website.
  • Local, place-based planning and coordination of the initiatives, involving:
    • engaging workforce coordinators in each of the eleven remaining rollout areas
    • establishing local NDIS employment and training networks in each area
    • developing a place-based NDIS Workforce Action Plan in each area, including targeted solutions, and attraction and engagement activities to meet local needs. 

The strategy was developed by a consortium of health and community services sector peak bodies representing the industry in Queensland, and key government agencies. It is being overseen by the joint sector and government Workforce Stewardship Group.

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 4—assist with the expansion and diversification of the workforce required to meet increased demand.

It will enable the delivery of innovative state-wide and local workforce expansion solutions to attract and build a diverse, ready workforce in line with NDIS phasing. The place-based approach, underpinned by joint sector and government workforce stewardship at a state level, will continue to drive workforce expansion and increase diversity.  

Project resources: The Queensland NDIS NGO Workforce Strategy (external)

The strategy, which proved extremely successful in the North Queensland early launch site (external PDF) and led to the development of the North Queensland NDIS Workforce Action Plan

You might also be interested in:

  • Providers looking to recruit more workers: accessing the information and resources on the Carecareers website, including the disability-specific job board.
  • Providers that have recruited workers who are new to the disability sector: accessing the Orientation Package to prepare workers to understand key concepts of the NDIS and working with people with disability.

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Initial capacity building projects

Building the capability of organisations to respond to consumer demand in the NDIS

This project aimed to increase service providers’ preparedness for the NDIS transition.

Timeframe: 2014­–15 (complete)

Overview: This project recognised the need to build provider understanding of the NDIS and the changes they would need to make to their delivery models to remain sustainable in the NDIS.

The project developed six interactive information resources to support providers to build their capabilities in six priority areas:

  • identifying, assessing and incorporating external factors in service development and business planning
  • knowing how to determine the features of services that clients most want in the development of new or the modification of existing services
  • understanding the financial impacts of new or modified services
  • assessing the non-financial impacts of new or modified services
  • practical approaches to improve marketing services to clients
  • leading and making changes to services.

The project used a co-design approach to develop the resources in consultation with providers. It then tested the resources with the providers and modified them to ensure all needs were met.

Following this, workshops were run across Queensland to introduce the resources and tools to providers and to deliver a live demonstration on how to use them.

Outcomes: This project contributed to SDF Outcome 3—build disability sector capacity and service provider readiness to manage the transition.

The resources were designed to address the priority capabilities identified by service providers. In the process of developing and testing the resources and tools, service providers gained a greater understanding of the NDIS and its likely impacts on their organisations.

Service providers found that the resources developed, targeted relevant priorities and appropriately tailored general business insights to the disability context. They confirmed that the tools provide practical support to their organisation in designing or re-designing services to meet the needs and preferences of people with disability and encourage a strengths-based approach.

Feedback from the demonstration workshops was positive. Providers indicated that the resources were valuable and would increase organisations’ understanding of the market environment and the financial and non-financial implications of marketing services. Providers were satisfied that the tools were more than a guide and that they provided data and point-in-time analysis that could be revisited to test progress and achievement.

Overall, service providers indicated that the project increased their preparedness for the NDIS by expanding their understanding of how the NDIS would increase choice and control for people with disability and change the market environment; and what they would need to do to structure their business to operate in this environment.

Project resources:

To access the information resources and tools (external):

  • Matching services to competitive factors (in the local environment): External scanning framework and templates, complemented by local area market data search tool.
  • Designing services that address client preferences: Guide and templates for engaging and taking directions from client feedback on services, including development of engagement plan.
  • Understanding financial implications of new services: Financial calculator tool to understand direct and indirect costs of a new or changed service, including basic unit costing.
  • Understanding other implications of new services on your business: Interactive diagnostic tool to understand the non-financial impacts of a new or changed service, including organisational readiness to change.
  • Marketing services to promote service features: Guides and templates for developing and executing a marketing plan.
  • Introducing new services – getting ready to deliver: Externally-focused change, communication and management guides and templates, complemented by staff presentation.

Background research: A summary report detailing the findings of the consultations and the capability challenges identified (external).

You might also be interested in:

  • Accessing the NDIS Provider Toolkit to self-assess your readiness for the NDIS or the related resources covering costing and pricing, marketing and ICT.
  • Accessing the NSW-developed Unit Costing Toolkit to assist you to calculate the cost of your services.
  • Accessing the NSW-developed Cash Management Maturity Assessment and other cash flow resources to determine your ability to manage current and future cash flow, and identify and prioritise areas that require improvement.

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Community capacity building activities in small rural and remote communities, and in discrete and remote Indigenous communities

This project aimed to build the capacity of rural and remote communities, and discrete and remote Indigenous communities, to deliver supports under the NDIS.

Timeframe: 2014–15 (complete)

Overview: This project recognised the additional challenges faced by rural, remote and discrete Indigenous communities to prepare for the NDIS.

The project selected three discrete Indigenous communities and three rural and remote communities to build their capacity to engage with the NDIS. 

The first round of consultation informed ‘Communities As-Is Assessments’—point-in-time assessments of the physical and social supports in place for people with disability in each of the six sites. A one-day workshop was held in Brisbane to discuss the findings with sector representatives and stakeholders from each of the project sites.

The second round of consultation informed the development of a Community Capacity Building Toolkit to build the capacity of other rural, remote and discrete communities to deliver supports under the NDIS. The toolkit helps communities undertake baseline capability analysis and develop community of practice networks to meet local needs. It also includes case studies of how communities have innovated to support people with disability. 

The project found that:

  • the extent to which services are integrated and a small number of providers dominate the market, varies across communities
  • having skilled and connected people in each community is useful for engaging providers and building capacity
  • timely and accessible information is critical for rural, remote and discrete communities, given technological literacy and access barriers common to these communities.

Outcomes: This project contributed to SDF Outcome 1—build community capacity and engagement—and SDF Outcome 2—increase capacity of people with disability and their families to exercise choice and control and develop new forms of support to meet the needs of people with disability.

The Community Capacity Building Toolkit provides a useful platform for raising awareness and building capacity within rural, remote and discrete Indigenous communities. The key messages developed throughout the project can be used to inform other sites on ways to assess baseline readiness and develop networks that meet local needs.

Project resources:

Community Capacity Building Toolkit (external).

You may also be interested in:

  • Finding out about the current Queensland project supporting Provider readiness in hard-to-reach and diverse markets.
  • Finding out about Remote Accredited Training to support remote service provision.
  • Finding out about the remote and rural Indigenous allied health workforce development project.

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South Australia

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Preparing people with disability who are difficult to engage

This project aims to increase the capacity of people with disability who are unlikely to engage with the NDIS.

Timeframe: 2016–18 (current)

Overview: This project recognises that some people require extra support to engage with the NDIS. These include people who have experienced homelessness and unstable accommodation, mental health issues, drug and alcohol dependency, interaction with the justice system, high use of hospitals and emergency care, behaviours of concern, violence, social isolation, guardianship orders , low literacy, and people whose carers prevent their engagement with services. It is estimated that up to 800 people with disability in South Australia fit into one or more of these groups.

The project is developing an engagement framework and targeted strategies to engage people with disability who have specific or complex needs. This involves:

  • identifying vulnerability indicators and levels of complexity
  • assessing engagement strategies that have worked in the past
  • engaging service providers that already work with these target groups or can provide specialist services
  • drawing on skilled Local Area Coordinators and Planners to form appropriate engagement approaches.

The project will then implement the engagement strategies, drawing on the support of the Local Area Coordinator pre-planning process to help people understand how the NDIS will benefit them and prevent them dropping out before NDIS services are in place.

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 2—increase capacity of people with disability and their families to exercise choice and control and develop new forms of support to meet the needs of people with disability.

The project will connect people with disability who would otherwise be unlikely to engage with the NDIS to supports.

Through establishing cross-sector partnerships with mental health or homelessness organisations, the project will encourage innovation in the way supports are provided and increase the diversity of support providers.

Project resources: Links to resources will be provided once these are available.

You may also be interested in:

  • Learning about the Tasmanian project working with hard to engage individuals.

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Assisting providers with readiness

This project aims to reduce the risk of market failure and retain a diverse range of service providers in the sector, particularly in rural and remote areas.

Timeframe: 2016–18 (current)

Overview: This project recognises that disability service providers have varying capacity to successfully transition to the new NDIS funding arrangements and that most providers in South Australia have not yet engaged with the NDIS.

It provides intensive, one-on-one assistance to help providers transform their business models to function effectively in the NDIS, with a focus on rural and remote providers. It engages a contractor to mentor and work with providers to help them identify business gaps and develop an action plan for the transition. This includes practical assistance in:

  • financial and costing analysis and techniques
  • bookkeeping, cost management and financial services
  • integration of IT and data management for multiple purposes
  • marketing and communication
  • investigating alliances, partnerships and merges.
  • Small grants are available to support providers have developed a sustainable action plan to meet identified goals.

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 3—build disability sector capacity and service provider readiness to manage the transition.

The project will support the development of a robust and diverse South Australian market in the transition to the NDIS. 

Project resources: Links to resources will be provided once these are available.

You might also be interested in:

  • Accessing the NDIS Provider Toolkit to self-assess your readiness for the NDIS or the related resources covering costing and pricing, marketing and ICT.
  • Accessing the NSW-developed Unit Costing Toolkit to assist you to calculate the cost of your services.
  • Accessing the NSW-developed Cash Management Maturity Assessment and other cash flow resources to determine your ability to manage current and future cash flow, and identify and prioritise areas that require improvement.

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Disability sector skills and employment development

This project aims to increase and develop the disability services workforce in South Australia in preparation for the full NDIS rollout.

Timeframe: 2015–18 (current)

Overview: This project recognises that demand for a skilled and diverse workforce will continue to increase as the NDIS is rolled out.

It involves building and attracting a skilled workforce through three sub-projects, focusing on: new disability workers, existing disability workers and new service providers.

  • Jobs First Employment Projects: This is an existing service that works with employers, industries and regional stakeholders to provide non-accredited training, case management, mentoring and work placements for job seekers. This project is targeting:
    • 300 job seekers for training in fields where gaps in the NDIS workforce have been identified
    • 150 existing disability workers in smaller organisations for upskilling, focusing on specialisation and diversification in the disability, home and community care, health administration, and leadership and management fields.
  • Enhanced Career Services: This is an existing service that provides one-on-one support to help people seeking new or different employment, connect with available training and work opportunities. The project is enhancing the existing program, with a focus on allied health services. It is targeting up to 1,500 job seekers from declining sectors including workers in the automotive industry, university graduates or currents students, Indigenous people, school leavers and young people, and mature age and unemployed job seekers to support the development of more diverse local disability workforces.
  • Building readiness in new enterprises: This project uses the High Performing Workplace Index, a diagnostic tool, to identify opportunities and priorities for up to 25 service providers. The results of the Index are being translated into provider Action Plans which focus on possible diversification, process improvement, workforce development and planning, business planning and innovation. The project then provides a series of targeted workshops and one-on-one support to respond to needs identified in the plans and to increase providers’ level of preparedness for the NDIS. 

A pilot project is also testing the benefits of making available financial support for current university students in allied health disciplines in exchange for commitment to remain and work in South Australia during transition to the NDIS.

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 3—build sector capacity and service provider readiness to manage the transition—and SDF Outcome 4—assist with the expansion and diversification of the workforce required to meet increased demand.

The project will build the capacity and capability of the local workforce to meet growing demand.

You might also be interested in:

  • Providers looking to recruit more workers: accessing the information and resources on the Carecareers website, including the disability-specific job board.
  • Providers with new staff: accessing the orientation training for new workers.
  • Learning about the ACT’s marketing activities to attract new workers and retain existing workers.

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Initial capacity building projects for consumers and providers

Parents Advocacy Booklet Project

This project aimed to increase the capacity of families of children with disability to exercise choice and control as they enter preschool or school.

Timeframe: 2013–14 (complete)

Overview: This project recognised that parents of children with disability need support to make well-informed decisions about their child’s education and advocate for their learning needs.

It developed the Ready Set Go booklet, which provides:

  • information on:
    • when children are required to start school
    • types of schools
    • children’s rights in education and additional support available.
  • advice on how to:
    • choose a school
    • prepare children for school
    • advocate for children with disability in the education system
    • manage change.

Outcomes: This project contributed to SDF Outcome 2—increase the capacity of people with disability and their families to exercise choice and control and develop new forms of support to meet the needs of people with disability.

Resources: You can access the Ready Set Go booklet (external PDF).

You might also be interested in:

  • Accessing information and resources to support you through your NDIS journey and engage with early childhood intervention through the Inclusion Hub website. 

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NDIS Individualised Business Consultant Project

This project aimed to develop the capacity of service providers to operate in the NDIS.

Timeframe: 2013–14 (complete)

Overview: This project recognised that some service providers would need individualised support to make the changes necessary to successfully transition to, and operate in the NDIS.

The project formed a consortium of business consultants from four organisations to offer expertise in business solutions, ICT and data management, structural knowledge of the disability sector and operational knowledge of disability organisations. Thirteen service providers received training and mentoring to build their capacity for the NDIS environment. This included:

  • an in-person discussion of their business model and readiness for the NDIS
  • support to prepare an Action Plan and a Grant Application
  • assistance to implement their Plan and encouragement to seek ongoing mentoring for technical or business solutions
  • workshops on issues of business sustainability.
  • Following the project, the Business Consultant offered some additional workshops to address remaining areas of need—in business development and data.
  •  
  • The project found that initial face-to-face engagement with providers helped encourage providers to complete their action plans and grant applications by the due date.

Outcomes: This project contributed to SDF Outcome 3—build disability sector capacity and service provider readiness to manage the transition.

It enabled service providers to develop their business models and increased their capacity to operate in the new NDIS environment. 

You might also be interested in:

  • Accessing the NDIS Provider Toolkit to self-assess your readiness for the NDIS or the related resources covering costing and pricing, marketing and ICT.

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Assistive Technology Equipment Repair Training Project

This project aimed to build capability in repairing assistive technology.

Timeline: 2013–14 (complete)

Overview: This project recognised a need for accredited training in assistive technology repairs to ensure quality and consistent services for people with disability.

It was run by Training Prospects in partnership with the Department of Communities and Social Inclusion, and had two parts.

  • Part One involved enrolling and training external repair technicians in Certificate III Engineering (Production Technology).
  • A total of 29 technicians began the Certificate III Engineering (Production Technology) course. By the end of the project, 10 had attained a Certificate III Engineering (Production Technology). The other 19 who attained a Certificate II Engineering (Production Technology) continued to work with Training Prospects after the project deadline to complete the full qualification.
  • The project involved an assessment of trainees’ current skills and knowledge, individual gap analyses and training plans, and a schedule of on-the-job training.
  • Training Prospects assessed whether existing Certificate III training met the appropriate level of technical requirements and added five welding units to distinguish between basic, intermediate and advanced skills.

Training Prospects found that working with repair technicians’ timeframes and having a flexible on-the-job training approach encouraged a stronger working relationship and enabled more technicians to complete training. They also found technician feedback useful for refining the Certificate III course.

  • Part Two was to consult with external repairers and people with disability and their carers to develop an industry- and consumer-driven training plan for a Certificate IV in Rehabilitation and Assistive Technology to be considered for future rollout.

Greater emphasis has been put on Certificate IV units that focus on communication, working in a team and listening. This was informed by consultations with people with disability, their carers and repair technicians who identified a disconnect between technicians and occupational therapy and the need for technicians to listen, empathise and understand what people with disability want and to provide a timely and individualised response.

This project was informed by a previous internal project run by Training Prospects to review and assess existing skills under a Certificate III.

Outcomes: This project contributed to SDF Outcome 4—assist with the expansion and diversification of the workforce required to meet increased demand.

Training Prospects successfully gathered input from people with disability, carers and repair technicians to ensure the Certificate IV in Rehabilitation and Assistive Technology course met the needs of consumers. This input led to more emphasis on communication skills in the Certificate IV course to give people with disability a more empathetic and person-centred service.

Project resources: Information on the Certificate IV Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies course (external).

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Tasmania

Contact: ndis@dhhs.tas.gov.au

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Building the capacity of people with disability, their families and carers

This project aims to empower people with disability to exercise choice and control in accessing services and supports, particularly those in rural and remote areas.

Timeframe: 2016–17 (current)

Overview: This project recognises that building the confidence and skill level of people with disability to access mainstream, universal and community services, is critical to a successful transition to the NDIS and that people with disability in rural and remote areas face additional barriers to engaging with the NDIS.

Part One involves sponsoring, developing and promoting information resources to: help participants choose the right service for them; negotiate confidently to get what they need; assess service quality; and raise issues when needed. Resources are being co-produced with people with disability and provided in a range of formats to meet different communication needs. These include video, print, Easy Read, Auslan, braille, large print and screen reader accessibility. The resources complement existing resources and cover topics such as:

  • understanding rights and responsibilities
  • the equal right to make decisions and have decisions respected
  • understanding mainstream, universal and community services
  • negotiating with community stakeholders, such as service providers or landlords
  • being safe from harm, abuse or neglect, and supported for reporting and navigating the justice system
  • working towards less support.

Part Two involves assisting people with disability, their families and carers, and providers in rural and remote areas, to more fully engage with the NDIS through audio-visual equipment. The Tasmanian Department of Health and Human Services will map existing audio-visual equipment to identify what is available, gaps and barriers to access, and possible audio-visual storage facilities. They will also discuss with facility owners how they could improve their existing audio-visual equipment and management. Training will then be provided to people with disability and other community members on:

  • how audio-visual equipment can be used to access and deliver NDIS supports
  • how to book and use audio-visual equipment
  • where equipment is located.

It will do this by providing accessible information that builds the capacity of people with disability to exercise choice and control and by increasing the use of technology to enable access to supports in rural and remote areas.

Project resources: Links will be provided to the information about the NDIS and how to make use of audio-visual equipment once these are available.

You may also be interested in:

  • People with disability, their families and carers: accessing information and resources through the Disability Loop website and Youtube Channel.
  • People with disability: joining a Peer Support Network.

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Building the capacity of providers

This project has two aims: to support individual providers to prepare for the NDIS, particularly those in rural and remote areas; and to strengthen the broader capacity of the sector.

Timeframe: 2016–18 (current)

Overview: This project recognises the need to build provider capacity to operate in the NDIS, and support the development of an effective market in rural and remote areas.

Part One encourages and supports a culture of innovation among disability service providers by funding a panel of experts—in technology, assistive devices, participant investment and training, marketing, small business operation and the use of evidence-based programs and practice—to provide support. Applications for expert support are being accepted from providers in every region, but priority is being given to smaller or sole providers and those working in thin markets or filling service gaps.

Part Two is funding several actions including:

  • a leadership training program at Certificate IV level
  • an emerging leaders program for support workers
  • a skillset training program on leading a diverse workforce
  • an innovation leadership network for senior managers
  • implementation of  the action learning network project to prepare the workforce for person-centred service delivery.

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 2—increase capacity of people with disability and their families to exercise choice and control and develop new forms of support to meet the needs of people with disability—and SDF Outcome 3—build disability sector capacity and service provider readiness to manage the transition.

It will build confidence, capacity and innovation among Tasmanian service providers and support the development of a professional workforce that delivers high quality, person-centred services. Expert support is designed to act as an incentive for new providers to operate in thin markets or fill service gaps.

Project resources: The project will produce a portal to apply for panel advice and support, several training programs and provide access to networks that connect providers. Links will be provided once these are available.

You may also be interested in:

  • Accessing the NDIS Provider Toolkit to self-assess your readiness for the NDIS or the related resources covering costing and pricing, marketing and ICT.
  • Providers that have recruited workers who are new to the disability sector: accessing the Orientation Package to prepare workers to understand key concepts of the NDIS and working with people with disability.

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Assisting hard-to-engage individuals to engage with NDIS

This project aims to identify and assist people with disability who have specific and/or complex needs, who may or may not be a current user of disability services and who would be unlikely to successfully engage with the NDIS.

Timeframe: 2016–18 (current)

Overview: This project recognises that some people will require extra support to engage with the NDIS. These include people who may have experienced homelessness or unstable accommodation, mental health issues, drug and alcohol dependency, involvement with the criminal justice system, high use of emergency care, behaviours of concern, violence or crime, social isolation, low literacy, guardianship or administration orders, or previous involvement with child protection services. It is estimated that up to 130 people with disability in Tasmania fit into one or more of these groups.

The Tasmanian Department of Health and Human Services is contracting services to develop and implement an Engagement Framework, drawing on work already undertaken by the South Australian Government. This involves assessing engagement strategies that have worked in the past, and developing appropriate strategies and an implementation plan to engage potential NDIS participants.

The project will then implement the plan, working with service providers that already support these target groups, or can provide specialist services. Most people the project identifies are likely to be eligible for NDIS individual packages, but some will need to be connected to Information, Linkages and Capacity Building supports.

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 2—increase the capacity of people with disability and their families to exercise choice and control and develop new forms of support to meet the needs of people with disability.

The project will connect people with disability who would otherwise be unlikely to engage with NDIS supports.

Project resources: Links to resources from this project will be provided once these are available.

You may also be interested in:

  • Learning about the South Australian project working with hard to engage individuals.

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Allied health sector workforce development

This project aims to increase the supply of a skilled and competent workforce of allied health professionals, allied health assistants and support workers in Tasmania.

Timeframe: 2016–18 (current)

Overview: This project recognises that the sector is facing challenges attracting and retaining enough allied health workers, particularly in rural and remote areas, to meet growing demand under the NDIS.

Part One involves:

  • determining the existing allied health workforce
  • working with the sector to forecast the mix of allied health workers and assistants required when the NDIS is rolled out
  • implementing strategies to recruit a workforce of allied health assistants in rural and remote areas including facilitating traineeships and structured professional supervision, using audio-visual technology to enhance regional coverage.

Part Two involves promoting the disability sector as a career of choice, in particular to under-employed groups. It will build on existing employment initiatives in the state including employment services, Vocational Education and Training policy and programs, immigration programs, and health and aged care workforce policy and programs. Strategies include:

  • developing discipline-specific and multi-disciplinary community of practice networks
  • a program to make use of under-employed workers and support those who are out of the workforce to return to work
  • a recruitment strategy targeting potential workforce participants.

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 4—assist with the expansion and diversification of the workforce required to meet increased demand.

The project will attract new workers to the allied health sector and contribute to quality allied health services in rural and remote areas.

Project resources: This project will produce promotional resources. Links will be provided once these are available.

You may also be interested in:

  • Providers looking to recruit more workers: accessing the information and resources on the Carecareers website, including the disability-specific job board.
  • Finding out about the remote and rural Indigenous allied health workforce development project.
  • Finding out about the Victorian project supporting greater utilisation of allied health assistants and VET trained disability care workforce.

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Initial capacity building activities

Building the capacity of people with disability, their families and carers

This project aimed to build the capacity of people with disability, their families and carers to engage with the NDIS.

Timeframe: 2013–16 (complete)

Overview: This project recognised the need to build the capacity of people with disability, their families and carers to identify goals and develop plans so they can take control of their supports in the NDIS.

Training for Education and Change delivered the following workshops to build the capacity of people with disability, their families and carers to take control of their supports in the NDIS:

  • Toward a better life
  • Really Learning, Actually Achieving
  • What does it mean to have a disability?
  • Dealing with the Present with an eye to the Future.

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 2—increase capacity of people with disability and their families to exercise choice and control and develop new forms of support to meet the needs of people with disability.

Following positive feedback, Training for Education and Change extended delivery state wide, delivering more workshops than originally planned and providing valuable information to participants, families and support workers. 

You may also be interested in:

  • People with disability, their families and carers: accessing information and resources through the Disability Loop website and Youtube Channel.
  • People with disability: joining a Peer Support Network.

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Building the capacity of providers

These activities aimed to support providers to develop the capabilities required to successfully transition to and operate in the NDIS.

Timeframe: 2013–16 (complete)

Overview: This project recognised the need to support existing disability service providers to develop their business practices in a range of areas.

The following training sessions and workshops were delivered.

  • Business Disciplines in a Changing Disability Marketplace workshops: Training and education for providers to understand key business areas requiring change with the NDIS, and possible alternate business models.
  • Tasmanian Disability Support Workers Conferences.
  • Active Support Community of Practice: Training and support for providers to implement the Active Support model to improve participation, choice and quality of life for people with intellectual disability.   
  • Flexible Workforce Workshop and Guide: A one-day workshop focusing on employing a flexible workforce in a person-centred environment.
  • Person-Centred Thinking and Planning workshops: Two one-day workshops designed to increase provider understanding of person-centred approaches and practices.
  • Leadership Preparation for Person-Centred Approaches workshop series: A series designed to support the disability and broader community services sector to build skills, knowledge and networks to help them address key sector trends.
  • Joint forums delivered by National Disability Services Tasmania and the Mental Health Council of Tasmania: Provided opportunities for the NDIA to network with providers and develop their understanding of the Tasmanian sector and referral processes.

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 3—build disability sector capacity and service provider readiness to manage the transition.

The training sessions and workshops helped to build the capacity of service providers in Tasmania. Targeted activities, such as the Business Disciplines workshops and Support Workers Conference were particularly successful, providing practical tools to develop provider capacity and educate staff about internal processes, such as performance reporting. The Tasmanian Department of Health and Human Services and local NDIA staff gained valuable insights from the Business Disciplines workshops into the level of preparedness within the Tasmanian sector. The Support Workers Conferences allowed the Department to engage with support workers and middle managers, who are traditionally harder to reach, and update them on new approaches to working with people with disability.

You might also be interested in:

  • Accessing the NDIS Provider Toolkit to self-assess your readiness for the NDIS or the related resources covering costing and pricing, marketing and ICT.

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Victoria

Contact: Anna.Donne@dhs.vic.gov.au

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Capacity building in Aboriginal and culturally and linguistically diverse communities

This project aims to improve access to the NDIS for Aboriginal and CALD communities.

Timeframe: 2016–18 (current)

Overview: This project recognises that Aboriginal and CALD communities face barriers engaging with mainstream and disability services that can prevent them from accessing the supports they need.

For both Aboriginal and CALD communities, this project involves:

  • establishing core capability within two key state-wide organisations representing the interests of Aboriginal or CALD communities and intersecting with other sectors, such as disability and mental health, to enable a coordinated response to community needs in getting ready for the NDIS rollout
  • delivering capacity building activities across the state to build skills in areas such as NDIS literacy, engage with the NDIS planning process and navigate the new service system
  • delivering peer support networks and communities of practice across Victoria.

For Aboriginal communities, the project is also delivering general and specialist support to Aboriginal  service providers to prepare for doing business under the NDIS in partnership with key disability peak organisations. It is also developing and delivering activities to enhance the cultural competency of mainstream disability service providers.

For CALD communities, the project is also developing resources and materials to support effective engagement and develop partnerships across peak associations and state-wide consumer groups.

Activities are informed by a needs analysis and community consultation to determine priority capacity building areas.

Outcomes: This project contributes to SDF Outcome 1—build community capacity and engagement—SDF Outcome 2—increase capacity of people with disability and their families to exercise choice and control and develop new forms of support to meet the needs of people with disability—and SDF Outcome 3—build disability sector capacity and service provider readiness to manage the transition.

It will improve access to the NDIS for people identifying as Aboriginal or CALD, improve the readiness of Aboriginal and ethnicity-specific service providers, and train Victorian mainstream services to meet the needs of Aboriginal and CALD participants and their families.

Project resources: This project will produce culturally-appropriate resources for Aboriginal and CALD communities. Links will be provided once these are available.

You may also be interested in:

  • People with disability and their families:
    • joining a Peer Support Network, including Networks for Indigenous people with disability, their families and carers
    • accessing information and resources through the Disability Loop website, including the ‘Let’s Yarn’ page for Indigenous people with disability.
  • Community members:
    • finding out about NDIS awareness raising activities undertaken by the First Peoples Disability Network.
  • Indigenous service providers
    • finding out about  capacity building activities undertaken by the First Peoples Disability Network.

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Building capacity in rural and regional areas

This project aims to develop local, innovative and efficient responses to the needs of people with disability, their families and carers in rural and regional Victoria.

Timeframe: 2016–18 (current)

Overview: This project recognises that service gaps may emerge in rural and regional communities without support to develop the market in these areas.

It is addressing these challenges through a pilot project operating in three rural and regional areas. The pilot has four key objectives:

  • improving investment, service coordination and integration
  • identifying local market, sector and workforce innovation opportunities
  • improving access to education, recreation, health, skills and, training and employment for people with disability
  • increasing the capacity of regional communities to participate in decision making and priority-setting activities.

In line with the NDIS Rural and Remote Strategy, there is not one particular type of delivery model, but tailored responses to meet the needs of particular locations.

Outcomes: This project will contribute to SDF Outcome 1—building community capacity and engagement—SDF Outcome 2—increase capacity of people with disability and their families to exercise choice and control and develop new forms of support to meet the needs of people with disability—and SDF Outcome 3—building disability sector capacity and provider readiness to manage the transition.

It will increase access to services for people with disability living in rural and remote areas.

You might also be interested in:

  • Accessing the Queensland-developed community capacity building toolkit, designed to support rural, remote and discrete Indigenous community providers.

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Greater utilisation of allied health assistants and VET trained disability care workforce

This project aims to improve access to allied health services for people with disability.

Timeframe: 2016–18 (current)

Overview: This project recognises that people with disability have increasing need for allied health care in the future, and that allied health assistants can help to meet this need.

The project is running 50 training workshops for disability service providers, private allied health practitioners and VET-trained disability workers, with at least six rural/ regional workshops to be held in each Department of Health and Human Services region. Workshops are using the evidence-based Supervision and Delegation Framework for Allied Health Assistants to build capacity to appropriately delegate tasks to allied health assistants.

Outcomes: This project will contribute to SDF Outcome 4—assist with the expansion and diversification of the workforce required to meet increased demand.

It will increase access to allied health supports by increasing allied health professionals’:

  • understanding of the roles, skills and contribution that assistant workforces can make to client outcomes and service design
  • ability to safely and appropriately supervise and delegate tasks to an assistant workforce
  • ability to work closely with other VET-trained disability care workers so that appropriately supervised allied health interventions can be delivered, supported or reinforced by these workers.

Project resources: Links to workshop information and resources will be provided once these are available.

You might also be interested in:

  • Finding out about the remote and rural Indigenous allied health workforce development project.
  • Finding out about the Tasmanian project to grow the allied health workforce.

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Enhancing NDIS-mainstream collaboration

This project aims to increase coordination between the NDIS and mainstream service systems to support streamlined and timely access to services and coordinated planning.

Timeframe: 2016–19 (current)

Overview: This project recognises that integrated responses across the NDIS mainstream and community services systems are essential to ensure people, particularly those who are most vulnerable and have the most complex needs, receive effective and well-coordinated service responses.

In 2015, the Commonwealth and States and Territories agreed to a set of shared principles to outline the responsibilities between the NDIS and mainstream service systems. This project is testing these principles through four discrete projects focused on different parts of the mainstream and community services systems. These include clinical health services, clinical mental health services, the justice system and the child protection/family service system. Each of the projects is investigating and establishing collaborative practice approaches for mainstream service systems to complement important functions of the NDIS, including Local Area Coordinators and support coordinators funded through NDIS participant plans.

Key features of each project include:

  • building NDIS literacy and learnings into mainstream and community service systems
  • supporting NDIS access, planning and plan implementation for NDIS participants who are also receiving supports through mainstream services
  • testing and sharing evidence of best practice approaches between the NDIA, disability service providers and the mainstream services system
  • developing collaborative approaches and protocols that can be considered for national application

Outcomes: This project will contribute to SDF Outcome 1—build community capacity and engagement—SDF Outcome 3—build disability sector capacity and service provider readiness to manage the transition—and SDF Outcome 5—build the evidence base about what works.

It will improve collaboration between disability, mainstream and community services to support timely access for people with disability; reduce the impact of disadvantage; and contribute to the long-term sustainability of the NDIS.

Resources: Links to resources from this project will be provided once these are available.

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Initial capacity building activities for consumers and providers

Timeframe: 2013–16 (complete)

Overview: Initial capacity building activities included:

  • information and capacity building activities for people with disability, their families and carers
  • consultancy and financial advice to support organisations in areas such as IT, financial, business process, human resources and risk management
  • Organisational Business Systems/ Reengineering Processes to assess providers’ current ICT capacity and develop IT improvement plans to facilitate their transition to the NDIS.

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Western Australia

Contact: MyWay@dsc.wa.gov.au 

These activities were informed by consultations with people with disability, service providers and the WA NDIS My Way Reference Group.

Initial capacity building activities

Building the capacity of people with disability, their families and carers

This project aimed to enhance individuals, families and carers’ understanding of the NDIS, their readiness to plan, and their capacity to exercise choice and control.

Timeframe: 2014 (complete)

Overview: This project recognised that some people with disability and their families would be unlikely to find out about the NDIS without a targeted strategy to reach them.

It provided customised information about the NDIS and the WA NDIS My Way supports and pathways to three ‘hard-to-reach’ population groups.

  • Families of children under 18 years: information was delivered face-to-face, as well as through electronic news bulletins and social media platforms.
  • People from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds: information was delivered through interviews with NDIA and WA NDIS My Way representatives on ethnic radio, monthly news bulletins and two targeted information sessions.
  • People with psychosocial disability: consumer and carer consultants were trained to deliver targeted information sessions. Three information forums were held and a focus group with participants was used to identify what worked well and what needed to be done differently in the future.
  • The project identified learnings for communicating with each of these groups, as well as the need to allow time for word-of-mouth promotion to attract hard-to-reach groups to attend information sessions. These included:
  • Families of children under 18 years wanted information that was easy to understand and updated regularly.
  • Information sessions for people from CALD backgrounds were most successful when linked to existing community events.
  • People with psychosocial disability felt more comfortable participating when service providers were not present at the sessions. They valued the information from NDIA advisors and information about real life difficulties associated with mental illness. They preferred it when disability terminology was avoided.

Outcomes: This project contributed to SDF Outcome 1—build community capacity and engagement—and SDF Outcome 2—increase capacity of people with disability and their families to exercise choice and control and develop new forms of support to meet the needs of people with disability.

After the targeted information sessions, 84 percent of participants reported an increased understanding of the NDIS and WA NDIS My Way supports and pathways, and improved capacity to exercise choice and control.

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Building the capacity of providers to deliver responsive services

This project aimed to enhance service providers’ understanding of the NDIS and improve responsiveness and flexibility.

Timeframe: 2014 (complete)

Overview: This project recognised the need to assist providers to develop more flexible models of support suitable for the NDIS environment.

It developed an intensive mentoring and coaching model to facilitate organisational change. This included two days of coaching for 20 representatives from disability support organisations and mental health organisations to help them develop strategic capacity building plans to ensure their services were individualised, personalised and responsive. Providers also participated in two intensive workshops and five days of coaching to support the implementation of their plans.

  • The project aimed to enhance providers’ understanding of the NDIS and arm them with practical strategies to support choice and control across critical areas of business practice:
  • leadership and strategy
  • attracting and responding to people and families
  • supports and strategies
  • organisational culture
  • staffing
  • structure and infrastructure systems
  • finance
  • quality development
  • organisational change
  • communication.

The project found ‘hands on’ mentoring and coaching were highly effective ways to facilitate organisational change. However, it is resource-intensive to stay up to date with rapidly evolving information; maintain and mentor coaches; and provide practical information on the application of new systems.

Outcomes: This project contributed to SDF Outcome 3—build disability sector capacity and service provider readiness to manage the transition.

The project enhanced providers’ level of understanding, technical skills and capacity to implement service delivery models based on individual and personalised supports, and their broader understanding of the NDIS and WA NDIS My Way. Overall, 86 percent of participating service providers reported having an enhanced understanding of the NDIS and increased capacity to offer choice and control.

You may also be interested in:

  • How providers of traditional centre-based supports worked to develop more person-centred and inclusive approaches through the Community Inclusion Initiative.

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Workforce readiness activities

This project aimed to enhance managers’ and support workers’ understanding of the NDIS and their ability to support choice and control for people with disability.

Timeframe: 2014 (complete)

Overview: This project recognised the need to build understanding of NDIS principles among managers and support workers.

It provided a program of training and information forums. These were designed to increase:

  • disability and mental health sector organisations' understanding of the NDIS and the operational and business systems required to deliver sustainable choice and control in a market environment
  • support of workers’ understanding of how to support consumer choice and control in daily living activities.

The project:

  • held an NDIS-themed disability sector State Conference, ‘A Brave New World’
  • ran five NDIS Sector Interest Group meetings
  • ran five NDIS sector information forums
  • delivered fourteen Sector Communiqués about the WA models
  • delivered ten training workshops for support workers and sixteen training workshops for middle managers.

The project found some anxiety around the NDIS from managers and staff, and that it was important to recognise and respond to varying levels of understanding of the NDIS. Providers found it useful to share experiences, challenges and successes.

Outcomes: This project contributed to SDF Outcome 3—build disability sector capacity and service provider readiness to manage the transition.

The project activities were designed to meet the training needs identified by disability and mental health service providers in the Lower South West My Way and NDIS Hills Trial sites.

As a result of the training workshops, 80 percent of participating managers and support workers reported having an enhanced understanding of the NDIS and the role of choice and control in supporting and empowering people with disability. The project also increased organisations’ understanding of the operational and business systems required to deliver sustainable choice and control in a market environment.

You may also be interested in:

  • Accessing the NDIS Provider Toolkit to self-assess your readiness for the NDIS.
  • Providers that have recruited workers who are new to the disability sector: accessing the Orientation Package to prepare workers to understand key concepts of the NDIS and working with people with disability.

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Quality assurance enhancement

This project aimed to align the Western Australian Quality Assurance System with the principles of the NDIS.

Timeframe: 2014 (complete)

Overview: This project recognised the need to enhance Western Australia’s quality assurance system for the NDIS environment.

This project involved enhancements to the Western Australian Disability Services Commission's Quality Assurance system to support continuous improvement, including capacity to self-assess and undertake independent evaluation of services, and the development and implementation of a flexible safeguarding framework.

The project developed:

  • four training modules
  • four sector information and training sessions.

The project found that it was important to: make the benefits of attending the training clear in promotional material; provide material that is clear and responsive to the needs of the sector; and acknowledge and build on existing practices and processes during the sessions.

Outcomes: This project contributed to SDF Outcome 3—build disability sector capacity and service provider readiness to manage the transition.

The project increased the capacity of organisations to provide quality services. As a result of the project, disability and mental health sector organisations have enhanced understanding of the changes to the WA Quality Assurance system and the impact these changes may have on their organisation. They also have access to information that is relevant to their specific needs and interests.

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